Senior Citizen In Bike Lane Hit By Truck

Our client, a lady in her seventies, was riding her bicycle in the bike lane when a man driving a large pick-up truck turned right from a cross street and struck her from behind, knocking her to the pavement.

  • She was rushed by ambulance to the emergency room where she was diagnosed with four rib fractures on the right and pneumohemothorax (collapsed lung). She was given an epidural for pain.
  • A CT scan revealed a massive right rotator cuff tear. X-rays revealed a right elbow enthesopathy (detached tendon).
  • She remained hospitalized for six days before being transferred to a rehabilitation center. She underwent occupational and physical therapy. She remained there for six additional days. She was given instructions for home self-care and was advised to keep her right arm in a sling.
  • She continued follow-up care with orthopedic surgeon. She underwent epidural injections in her shoulder. An MRI on March 18 revealed the large rotator cuff tear with associated muscular atrophy, tendinosis of the subscapularis and arthropathy.
  • She endured several grueling months of physical therapy and rehabiltation. Developing adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder) is common in this type of injury and she will have to continue a dedicated self-help home care program of exercise and stretching.
  • Due to her age it was decided that rotator cuff repair surgery was not a viable option despite her limited range of motion. However, her orthopedist indicates that a total shoulder replacement is a very real possibily.
  • Prior to the accident she had a very active lifestyle. She played golf with friends twice a week and biked with friends several times a week. In the winter she participated in bowling. All of these activities have been curtailed during the rehabiitation from her injuries.
  • She has developed symptoms of PTSD, anxiety and depression and will need to continue to address these issues with additional talk therapy.
  • She also needed dental work for a cracked tooth and crown.

The law firm of MartinLaw PLLC was successful in completing a mid six figure settlement for this lady within six months of the accident.

To find out how MartinLaw, PLLC and attorney Chuck Martin will handle your car or bicycle accident case please visit the bicycle or car accident page.


Personal Injury News: Avoiding Pedestrian Accidents in Seattle

When you cross the street, walk to and from your office on your lunch break, or traverse Seattle’s sidewalks as you enjoy a night out on the town, just how safe are you? Whether or not you follow pedestrian traffic laws such as crossing at crosswalks instead of ‘jaywalking’, pedestrians are at risk for all kinds of injury and even death – just by walking down the street.

Luckily, ours is one of the safest national cities for pedestrians. Earlier this year, the Seattle Times reported on a study that found, “Among large U.S. cities, Seattle has the second-lowest fatality rate for pedestrians and cyclists, according to a new report … Seattle came away with the second-lowest fatality rate for pedestrians.” (Click here for a map of collisions involving pedestrians and/or bicyclists from 2007-August 2014.)

However, walkers still need to practice caution while they go about their travels throughout the city – particularly if they are elderly, as a 2011 local Crosscut article noted. More than half of the 62 traffic fatalities from 2008-2010 involved pedestrians, and the average age of the 25 pedestrian fatalities was 64.

As the numbers of people biking and/or walking to work only increase, there is more risk for personal injury and fatality. But there are ways that pedestrians in particular can improve on the safety of their commute. Here are some tips for avoiding pedestrian accidents in Seattle…

  • Follow pedestrian traffic laws. Many walkers know that vehicles and even cyclists must always yield to pedestrians. While this is certainly true, that doesn’t make it safe to assume or trust that drivers and cyclists will – or can – do so. Don’t cross the street where there is not a marked crosswalk or pedestrian crossing sign. Even then, look both ways and wait for drivers and cyclists to come to a complete stop before crossing in front of them.
  • Walk with others. Research has shown that accidents and fatalities resulting from pedestrian-car accidents are reduced in areas where there are more people walking. As you commute, choose routes with higher pedestrian traffic.
  • Be noticeable and alert. When walking at night, wear reflective and bright clothing, and if you can, carry a flashlight. Do not walk and talk on the phone or text-message – especially when crossing the street. Stay alert and take note of vehicles that seem to be speeding, allowing them to pass or stop before you cross the street in front of them.

If you or someone you love is a pedestrian involved in an accident with a car or bicyclist, please contact our offices to acquire the guidance and expertise to seek justice.

Featured photo source: Flickr.